Awakened consciousness: living the resurrection

I belong to a dispersed community called Contemplative Fire and here is the Easter message from the founder, Philip Roderick, to all of us ‘Companions on the Way’ as we are called. Most of us are in the UK but there are others in Canada and even Hawaii. Philip writes:

Christ is risen! Alleluia! How is this mystery to be revealed this week, this day, this moment in my life, your life, our life? As the darkness of night gives way to the lightness of dawn (as I write), and as the dying back of winter gives rise to the buds, leaves, blossoms and fragrances of spring, how do you and I discover an Alleluia in our own awareness, lifestyle and service?

I am inspired by the work of Cynthia Bourgeault. I was delighted to learn in Wisdom Jesus of her gratitude to Jim Marion’s Putting on the Mind of Christ, where he explores a different way of interpreting Jesus’ often-repeated phrase “the kingdom of heaven”. He sees this as a metaphor for a state of consciousness, “It is a whole new way of looking at the world, a transformed awareness…” So, “the kingdom could well be translated as “awakened consciousness” or “unitive consciousness”. So often, Jesus would begin a teaching by saying “The kingdom of God is like….” Could a way of doing full justice to the inner structure of his teaching be to say: “Awakened consciousness is like….”?

Living in the awareness of God’s kingdom was the clear focus and aspiration of the Jesus mystery, expressed in his teaching of the close disciples and the crowds. The main challenge to that unitive state and liberated intention during Jesus’ last days was suffering and desolation, pain and disintegration. Or so it seemed to the ones who travelled deep with him. This was the end. It appeared so even to the Marys and to John, devoted followers, gathered in grief in the hellish place of absence and aridity. They were at the cross, holding on to scraps of truth in the midst of lies.

He, the awakening and the awakened one, was not only on the Cross, but in the Cross. Dying into the place of intersection. We, as his disciples, as his body, may find ourselves there also – occasionally, regularly, permanently? The point of departure proves to be the place of arrival, but in a new key, at a new level of being. In his Living Between Boundaries, Philip Sheldrake looks into the significance of a cross over a burial site – a meeting place of apparent opposites. The cross embodies a “cosmic entrance and exit point where the material world and the world of the spirit were believed to come into especially close contact.”

Consciousness of God is not tripped up and ambushed by Christ’s journey into the closed quarters of hopelessness and ultimate homelessness, into death. Rather, immersed in the turbulence of our own aspirations, trajectories and periodic buffetings, to our surprise, we discern that what, on occasion, we feel to be the end of meaning, the eschaton, the terminus, is not in fact. Chaos, we gradually discover, is able to sponsor and release from within itself a new beginning, an unfolding of divine-human solidarity; love at all levels.

Rowan Williams once wrote: “The resurrection is cross-shaped”. As with Yeshua, so with us. The rising happens from within the tomb, from inside the hidden place of dying to self. Absence yields presence. There is a greening of the desert, a leavening of the dough, a rolling of the stone, a rising of the sun. Having negotiated the Lenten beckoning to “Risk Reality”, our invitation now is to “Welcome Life“.

Happy Eastertide! May an awakened consciousness be graced to each of us!

Amen to that!

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